Clockmaking for the Model Engineer

£12.30

Written to help the established model engineer who would like to build a first clock, this book does just that extremely well. There are no instructions on how to get the best from your lathe, how to set up work on the milling machine, or similar sorts of advice. It is assumed that you know these things already, and that you are experienced in the use of hand tools. Perhaps you have thought you would like to make a clock (a future family heirloom), and wish to know what specialist techniques and tooling are required. This book takes you through the construction of a typical clock, describing, as they arise, those techniques of the clockmaker that differ from, or are seldom used, in model engineering.Specialist tools and their uses are also described, as the need for them arises during clock construction. Virtually all of these tools can be made by the clockmaker; clockmakers have always been toolmakers as well. Finally, drawings are provided for one simple, and unusual, clock which is ideal as a first clock making project, but which still requires you to make all the pieces likely to be found in many more complex timepieces. Within the pages of this book, well known horologist Colin Thorne has provided the model engineer with an ideal introduction to the fascinating world of clock making. Here is comprehensive information, put over in a relaxed and readable way, with lots of 'wrinkles' which will useful to all model engineers, whether or not they go on to build their own horological masterpiece. Any model engineer considering making his first clock should have this book on his bookshelf. 88 A4 format pages. 58 drawings in text plus complete set of 9 drawings for the Benjamin Franklin Clock and 11 B & W photos. Softcover. Camden. (Customers in North America should note that this work has been published by Guy Lautard, in a different edition called Clockmaking for the Home Machinist) .. its coverage is remarkably comprehensive...... I found this a useful addition to the available literature and more easily read than some of the existing text books on the subject. Neil Read - Review in Model Engineer